Whole Life Coaching?

For the next several postings, I will talk about what makes a successful life coaching relationship. From the way I have been taught and trained, the following components are significant contributors: 1. The focus is the person’s whole life. 2. The coaching environment is a safe place in which the client can grow. 3. The truth is always [...]


For the next several postings, I will talk about what makes a successful life coaching relationship. From the way I have been taught and trained, the following components are significant contributors:

1. The focus is the person’s whole life.

2. The coaching environment is a safe place in which the client can grow.

3. The truth is always told.

4. The possibilities are limitless.

5. There is a reserved space, just for the client.

6. The relationship is soulful.

The focus is the person’s whole life.  I love hearing that! Let me expand on this type of coaching for this entry. Come back in the next few days, or subscribe to the feeds (or newsletter) to follow the other five components on the list.

Okay, the assumption is that clients don’t live their lives in boxes of work, health, relationships, and so on, even though they might say they do. Whatever is going on in one aspect of of clients’ lives impacts other areas of their lives. Does this ring true for you? C’mon now, I can see you nodding your head.

Frankly, I would be doing my clients a disservice when I help them excel in one aspect of their lives while ignoring the rest. From my training and experience, focusing on the whole-life is critical. This is why some of us call our work “life coaching” rather than business coaching, relationship coaching, transition coaching or some other title.

Usually, a good coach will always use some type of whole life assessment in their early sessions with a client. These whole-life assessments permits the coach to see how the client evaluates his or her level of satisfaction in significant areas of a balanced life, including career, health, finances, relationship, spirituality, personal growth (including intellectual and emotional), leisure, family, and continuing education. (see the Wheel of Life assessment, a free tool I offer, on the sidebar)

Clients simply benefit from acknowledging that they DO have a whole life. I often see clients who are stuck on one part of life, such as work, but blind to the other aspects of their lives and how they interrelate. When coaches help them see things from a whole-life perspective, clients are often amazed to discover how some pieces have been neglected or pushed aside.

You’ll note that the first coaching specialty I list in my core coaching area on my website is, you guessed it, Whole Life Coaching. Here it is.

Posted in Life Coaching Tagged: Life Coaching, Whole Life Coaching

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